One of the most common complains of adults working with younger generations is the lack of common sense. This is something that we take for granted until we come across or have to work with someone that lacks it. And yet is imperative to human survival. Having common sense makes life easier and makes you a better rounded more functional adult. It’s also an important tool to excel in for any endeavor.

Movement is one of the most essential functions of the human body when it comes to staying healthy; and, luckily for us, children are born with endless enthusiasm for physical activity. Unfortunately, their need to move doesn’t always fit into society’s ‘big picture’ and idleness becomes part of their social conditioning.

It is much harder for a teacher to control 20 moving targets rather than 20 sedate ones seated at desks, bogged down with busywork. So, our children become indoctrinated to the idea of what ‘acceptable behavior’ is, and those who cannot abide by the rules are labeled as ill or dysfunctional.

Later, as adults, we realize that exercise is critical for health. So, we schedule planned movement sessions that many of us don’t enjoy because they are not organic or spontaneous, but just one more thing we MUST add to the day’s agenda.

 

     There are so many adults that are completely unaware of the organic nature of their emotions. Feelings creep up on them at unexpected times and they totally loose control to them. Emotions are not negative. They are actually a major part of being human. They are also not categorized as bad or good. But some emotions such as happiness are definitely easier to cope with than others. This makes it very important for children to be taught how to properly identify, process and live with emotions.

If you have ever participated in any sort of mindfulness training, chances are you have had some exposure to meditation. In the mainstream, meditating seems to have become more Westernized, tied more so to health than to religious or spiritual practice. Meditation is the practice of focusing one’s mind for a period; stepping back from the mind to place oneself in the now, clearing thoughts of the past and future, and relieving the mind of all thought. Meditation is most commonly practiced in a quiet, relaxed setting while seated or lying down. It is commonly used to relieve stress and to refocus the mind on goals or tasks. For children, this a bit of a complex subject—not based on the results meditation can offer a child, but more regarding its practicality, as being still for long periods of time is not something that most young children are comfortable doing.

 

     The beginning of my first born’s life is a bit of a blur for me. I had had a really rough pregnancy, then a C-section and a not so pleasant recovery. That coupled with the daily learning process that came with being a new parent, left me in angst and doubting my abilities regularly. My fix for this was to sit in my head and do research and buy every gadget available. Nothing seemed to calm the anxiety and having a child with colic just didn’t help matters at all. Needless to say I was cut off to the flow of the universe and to my own insticts.

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ABOUT KAREN

Karen Matamoros is a coach helping parents create freedom in life, business and homeschooling while creating daily flow and cultivating their relationship with their children. She is also the founder of Project: KAring, an alternative education portal for kids focused on the body, mind, and soul. She created this community to make free form education easily accessible to every child, though a directory, forums and scholarships. A few years ago, she decided to sell her 6-figure business to start unschooling her two daughters on the road full time and has been traveling the world ever since.

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